A deviation

We’ve had a lot of rain lately so I decided to deviate from my usual route home and drive out to the waterfall.    Once out of town I drove past soft green wintery paddocks where black cows grazed.   On low lying ground large sheets of silvery water reflected the rain clouds gathered overhead.

Out at the waterfall the noise of falling water filled the soundscape.   Rain had fallen recently and the ground was a maze of puddles and slippery mud.   The air was cold but no wind blew.   With my camera in hand I braved the elements.

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Outside my car the rush of water was even louder.    Time disappeared as I walked around the various lookouts, picked my way across muddy ground and fiddled with camera settings.    It was only when I drove away that I realised my mind had deviated away from the thoughts have been pre-occupying me for days.  Out there, within that wall of white noise, my attention had been entirely focused on the moment now.

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prompts:

https://wordofthedaychallenge.wordpress.com/2018/07/10/deviate/

https://frankjtassone.com/2018/07/07/haikai-challenge-41-7-7-18-waterfall-taki-haiku-senryu-haibun-tanka-haiga-renga/

 

 

 

 

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23 thoughts on “A deviation

      1. wow I truly hope the farmers got some of it … was in Bendigo in April and from airport up and all around the region was in a shocking state of drought!

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      2. ah remember Warnambool well, cycled from there to Geelong … great way to see the Great Ocean Road! No Bendigo is more inland, I think coastal areas generally get more rainfall.
        And to think I didn’t see those falls 😦

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      1. It can be most of the time 🙂
        Early spring there are fisherfolk on the opposite site, for a few weeks. And I was told by a neighbor that last year (first time that I can remember anyway) that the creek completely froze over that some of the critters from the other side crossed over. Coyote maybe. Though I’ve not seen them, myself.

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      2. The yard has the creek as a border then a strip of utility easement land on the other side of it. Then the other neighbors back yards… so it is a little sanctuary in the suburbs. But go just a few mile more north and you’ve got farms with cows, steer and even goats. As well as produce. We’ve a big Amish population in this state. Though those quiet people have had to diversify.

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      3. People forget though that the Amish have their own issues. While they are mostly peaceful they have their everyday people problems too. Many years ago I worked with an Amish Gent who really didn’t like his sister-in-law, and though he did not swear – he came very close 😉
        The Amish have also had to make some adjustments for lack of land. I watched a show once where a shop that displayed Amish quilts (might have been local, but I don’t recall) actually farmed out the quilting paying less to another country. Not sure if the owner was Amish or not.

        While there have been some shows about the Amish, not all are 100% accurate or true. There is no such thing as an Amish Mafia as the TV program might suggest. But I am sure there are those families that have feuds or disagree with the Bishop in charge of their ‘church’.

        Tolerance and respect for all would be really nice if it could only work. There was actually one Amish family that ended up in jail for a hate crime against another Amish family. Could that be the influence of all us English (as any who are not Amish are called) or was it just ‘human nature’ at its worst?

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      4. And before the Amish are ‘Baptized’ – they
        Rumspringa… are allowed to experience English ways to some extent.
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumspringa

        Amish children have limited school house education, no homework (they do have chores…) and most do go back into the ‘Fold’ so-to-speak. Amish families tend to be large with 6 – 10 children per Mother.

        Amish are stricter and a younger religious group than the Mennonites.

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  1. For 55 years I lived within an hours drive form those falls and only ever visited when I set my son’s year 8 Geography class an opened task. He chose to photograph the falls in March, so not much water. Had to drive back last August, 2017, to see some real water flowing over.

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    1. Yes the falls aren’t much to look at in January. Winter and Spring are definitely the best. Apparently there is one week in January where the eels climb up the falls on their way back to their breeding grounds. That would be quite a sight. I’ve never seen it myself.

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